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ELISE | Informing your studies tutorial: Plagiarism

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Ethics

As a student at UNSW, you are bound by the ethical standards of the University in all aspects of your studies.

An important part of this is the ethical use of scholarly materials, upholding the University's standards in scholarship and research.

Tip Read more about ethical behaviour at UNSW in the A-Z Guide: Ethical use of Scholarly Materials

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the act of presenting another person's work or ideas as your own. Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics at UNSW and is not taken lightly.

UNSW groups plagiarism into these categories:

Copying

Using the same or very similar words to the original text or idea without acknowledging the source or using quotation marks.

Inappropriate paraphrasing

Changing a few words and phrases while mostly retaining the original structure and/or progression of ideas of the original, and information without acknowledgement.

Collusion

Presenting work as independent work when it has been produced in whole or part in collusion with other people.

Self-plagiarism

Also known as duplication, self-plagiarism occurs where an author republishes their own previously written work and presents it as new findings without referencing the earlier work, either in its entirety or partially.

Inappropriate citation

Often an author will cite someone else's research. It may not always be possible to locate the original source. It is considered plagiarism to cite sources which have not been read, without acknowledging the secondary source from which knowledge of the original source was obtained.

Inappropriate citation also includes padding reference lists with sources that have not been used in an assignment.

 

Understanding the principles related to the ethical use of information will help you avoid unintentional plagiarism or poor academic practice.

By developing good academic writing skills, you will be less likely to plagiarise another person's work:

  • learn how to form your own opinions from the work that others have published
  • acknowledge the original author of any work that you have quoted, summarised or paraphrased in your assessments

Knowing how to correctly reference the information you use in assignments is also important in helping you to avoid plagiarism:

  • know the types of works that must be referenced
    e.g. books, articles, web pages, statistics, photographs, etc.
  • know how to use the appropriate referencing style for your course
     

Tip Learn more about academic writing on the The academic writing process page, under the Creating tab.

Tip Learn more about referencing on the Referencing page, under the Presenting tab.

Tip Read UNSW's Plagiarism Policy Statement

Tip The Academic Study Skills website has a comprehensive section on academic integrity and plagiarism. Read this information carefully to learn more about how plagiarism can occur unintentionally and develop the skills you need to avoid it

Avoiding plagiarism

 

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Avoiding plagiarism

Plagiarism occurs when you present another person's work or ideas as your own. Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics at UNSW and is not taken lightly. So how do you avoid it? UNSW groups plagiarism into these categories:

  • copying
  • inappropriate paraphrasing
  • collusion
  • duplication
  • inappropriate citation

By developing good academic writing skills, you will be less likely to unintentionally plagiarise another person's work.

Knowing how to correctly reference the information you use in assignments, forming your own opinions and acknowledging the original author, are also important in helping you to avoid plagiarism.

Schools and faculties use different referencing styles, so check you are using the right one.

You can find some referencing style guides in the Library, or get further assistance at the UNSW Learning Centre.

As a student at UNSW, you are part of a broader academic community and bound by the ethical standards of the University. An important part of this is the ethical use of scholarly materials, upholding the University's standards in scholarship and research.